Dear Monu by Neha Dalwani

By Volunteer Neha Dalwani, FHI Surat

“Your greatest contribution to the universe may not be something you do, but something you raise.”

In a tech diverted world, where number of likes on posts makes a person happy, check-in at the most expensive place makes one successful, brands makes a person look rich. A question arises, is that person really happy? We are living in an era where people do things just for the sake of showing it to other people, to maintain a certain so called “status” in the society. We are so busy in living our life that we often forget about the people who have nothing to maintain but all they have is a heart. The richest person despite having everything may not be happy, while a person living on the streets has nothing but may still be happy.

Why not make our society happier, why don’t we together take a step for the betterment of underprivileged children by taking care of them, asking them about their day, why can’t we be a rainbow in their life?

I’m sharing you a story, which made me do every possible thing about underprivileged children, and since then every morning my only goal is to make their day bright.

Almost a year ago, I was having pani-puri from a street stall, the vendor looked very young, almost 12 years old. Out of curiosity, I questioned him about his school education, or why is he handling business in early years of his life, of-course my questions made him awkward, and he felt embarrassed. So I stopped and left. But my heart was still there I was replaying the whole conversation in my mind to get the answers behind his smile and gestures but couldn’t help it.

After few days I visited him again, this time he wasn’t there. His mother was handling the stall, I asked her what’s the matter. She too denied to answer but then we sat and had a conversation. I discovered Monu (the guy) lost his father two years ago in a road accident, so he didn’t get a chance to goto school and he had to continue his father’s business.. as he was the eldest family member, his siblings were younger. It shook me, it made me numb for a while.. I left. Again it left me with a series of unanswered questions.

I went again, this time not to ask him anything but ask him to co-operate with me for his own good. I’m pretty young and obviously can’t afford to pay for his education, but all I can do is to be his mentor, his support pillar, I can guide him, though it won’t make a huge difference but that slightest difference would make a huge impact in his life.

I asked him to visit my house every morning, I’ll teach him basics, and make him capable so that he can earn better for his family.

He used to come almost thrice a week, and every time he used to bring something from his stall for me and my mother. This was his sweet nature which made him more special. Monu was a quick learner, he grabbed things way too quickly than normal children. I taught him for 6 months. He didn’t come for two weeks, after two weeks he came with a box and a million dollar smile on his face. He gave me the happiest news, that he got admission in a school. And that moment was priceless for me. I can’t describe in words, there are no right words to express his happiness.

When you teach a child, you don’t teach only him, you’re also teaching his future generations.

Since that incident, my only ultimate goal for life is to spread free education.

Instead of teaching book meanings, I would rather like to teach them life skills, practical knowledge and all that is necessary for standing confidently to face the world.

FHI is a perfect platform to change the lives of thousands of underprivileged. At FHI, we focus on overall development of a child, we try to make him smart in every possible aspect.

Each month, we’ve a different areas of focus. 

Theme based event, helps the volunteers to craft extraordinary skills in children.

Being a FHIian, I feel proud and happy that somewhere in India another Monu is carrying a million dollar smile, cause you made his day a little brighter!

“Inside every child is a rainbow, waiting to shine.”

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